Discipline Type

Infrastructure & Utilities

Well planned and delivered infrastructure plays a fundamental role of sustaining the way we live and improving our quality of life. But inadequate infrastructure can obstruct growth, exacerbate existing inequalities and place undue pressures on our environment. Following new programmes such as the GLA’s Infrastructure Coordination Service, Authorities are taking a more proactive and collaborative approach to infrastructure, which is becoming redefined as a standalone discipline at the heart of creative and innovative planning, design and delivery of better cities.

WHO THEY ARE

Candidates who are placed in Infrastructure and Engineering roles can come from a variety of backgrounds including Civil Engineering, Transport Planning, Structural Engineering, Project Management and Architecture. What these practitioners have in common is an interest in the sorts of systems that need to be in place to solve urban problems and an understanding or experience of the processes organisations like Developers, Utilities Companies, Contractors and Highway Authorities go through. Applicants that thrive in these placements have the ability to see the bigger picture, to wear many hats, are excellent at communicating, have exceptional stakeholder management skills and strong technical knowledge with practical application.

WHAT THEY DO
  • Support the development of initiatives designed to improve the way in which infrastructure is coordinated and delivered.
  • Identify partners and delivery options, and convene collaborations.
  • Offer technical advice and project management, including interfacing with highways authorities, utilities, contractors, and others.
  • Use data and maps to better plan and coordinate infrastructure development across London.
  • Support the development of more liveable, healthy, sustainable and diverse places.
INFRASTRUCTURE: PLANNING
  • Working to ensure infrastructure is considered upfront as an essential component of placemaking.
  • Determining infrastructure requirements in growth locations and identify opportunities for innovation in design and delivery to meet the demands of growth and net-zero targets.
  • Working collaboratively with infrastructure providers, developers and others to ensure infrastructure is realised ahead of demand; leveraging stakeholder relationships, data, and understanding of regulatory processes.
  • Developing solutions to infrastructure planning and delivery challenges; identifying new opportunities in areas such as data and modelling tools, working arrangements and infrastructure planning methodologies.
INFRASTRUCTURE: DEVELOPMENT
  • Developing a detailed understanding of the local development and infrastructure context.
  • Liaising with multiple Authority departments, city government, utility providers and developers to advise on local infrastructure context and need.
  • Promoting initiatives that prioritise collaboration between utilities, developers and the Authority.
  • Being proactive in improving the reputation of infrastructure and utilities – for example through opportunities to present, speak or promote the sector.
  • Making the most of opportunities to engage with the public and respond to their ideas and feedback, with the ultimate aim of minimising disruption to residents, businesses and visitors
  • Interrogating information on planned, proposed and in-progress projects that may interfere or can be coordinated with adjacent developments – or to realise efficiencies and economies.
  • Helping inform policy, process and potentially regulation through reporting, case studies and development of documents.
INFRASTRUCTURE: STREETS
  • Establishing the viability of collaborative streetworks through discussions with utilities, highways authorities, contractors, and others – including providing technical civil engineering advice.
  • Project managing the delivery of collaborative streetworks, including joint traffic management planning, permitting/traffic orders, cost-sharing, and communications discussions.
  • Using digital tools to identify potential collaborative opportunities between infrastructure providers.
INFRASTRUCTURE: DATA
  • Using maps, GIS and data analysis to support decision making and policy development.
  • Engaging with diverse partners (utilities, infrastructure providers and other Authorities) to collect data and build digital capability.
  • Creating analytics and visualisations using data.
  • Communicating well with a wide range of people and convey passion and enthusiasm for data and digital tools to replace business as usual.
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